Barton DNA Project
November 27, 2007
Discussion - Lineage I

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We now have 76 men included in this Lineage by testing - representing more than 30 separate families.  (1000s more are indicated, as each tested man represents his paternal line - which is his father's father's ... father's male line and all of these men's son lines ).  We include a handful of men with other surnames.  Two of these men knew that their heritage was Barton, one was adopted at birth and knew nothing of his heritage and the others are working to understand how their Barton genetic ancestry emerged in their surname.

We are a part of Haplogroup R1b - the most common in Europe.  Our ancestors (according to National Geographic's "Early Man Migration")  See the National Genographic site for their incredibly detailed story of the migration of man.

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Started in the Eastern Rift of Africa over 100,000 years ago

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Left Africa about 60,000 years ago, moving into the Middle East

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Left the Middle East about 40,000 years ago, moving into Central Asia

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Left Central Asia about 35,000 years ago

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Moved into Europe about 30,000 years ago

General information about our Haplogroup R1b

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About 40% of all men who trace their origins to Europe are R1b

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Proportions of R1b in the European populations  increase as you move from east to west

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Haplogroup R1b is defined by a genetic marker, M343 - which first appeared about 35,000 years ago

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Based on a formal test (called a "SNP" test) of several of our men, we are sub-classified as R1b1c

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R1b1c Haplogroup Description from Family Tree DNA -- believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago

General comments about our Lineage I

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Our paper trails ending in the 1600s & 1700s are only found thus far in Lancashire and the southern USA

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Our Barton Lineage I has no close matches  with other surname families at 37 markers

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We are most distinguishable by our 14-10 at marker DYS385 - where most R1b's are 14-11

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We also are different from the most common R1b marker results at DYS464c, DYS456, DYS576 and CDYa/b

We can begin to see "branching" in our Barton Lineage I by small differences called "mutations".  When these mutations are shared by some men and not others, we theorize that these were inherited from a shared common ancestor. 

We identify a branching in our Lineage I by our results at CDYb

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Through our paper trails, we know that this mutation occurred no later than the 1620s

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Group CDYb=36 has 61 men.  We call this the "Colonial" group, based on 1600s paper trails to colonial VA & MD

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Group CDYb=37 has 15 men.  We call this the "Lancashire" group, based on a 1600s paper trail to Lancashire

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CDYb=37 men whose paper trails end in the Southern US  are believed to not descend from the Colonial VA & MD families, but to have immigrated separately

We have identified a number of family branches through shared mutations:

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The Colonial MD family appears to be identified by a 12 at DYS444.  More testing is required to verify

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The Colonial VA family appears to be identified by a lack of any defining mutation.  This is an unsatisfactory definer - and it is hoped to be a temporary situation.  We will have to test more markers to find an identifier for this family

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The "Thomas m Elizabeth Ward" branch of the MD family and a number of later families share a 12 at DYS391

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The "Henry, b1793" family shares a 12 at Y-GATA-H4

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The "Bavestor" & "David m Elizabeth McCormack" families share a 14 at DYS393

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The John, b c1737 Randolph Co NC family and two men surnamed Eskew share a 16 at DYS570

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The "Willoughby m Sarah West" family is identified by a 18 at DYS557. 

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A branch of the "David m Ruth Oldham" family has two distinguishing mutations - a 13 at DYS388 and a  11 at DYS452.  Origins of both mutations are confirmed to living men, so this branch information is of limited use.

We have also identified some possible branches, which need additional testing to confirm

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Shared 18s on DYS576 for A-38 & F-4

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Shared 36s on CDYa for B-39 & B-16

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Shared 12s on DYS461 for D-11 & D-16

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Shared 16s on DYS557 for B-28 & D-03

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Shared 18 at DYS557 for A-47 with D-11 & F-11

There are a few shared mutations that paper trails & other mutations suggest are random matches - instead of shared mutations.  Further testing would probably confirm this - but isn't recommended.  We are ignoring these.

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Shared 30s on DYS449 for A-43 and A-16

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Shared 18s on DYS576 for B-39 with A-38 & F-4

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Shared 16s on DYS557 for B-28 and A-43

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Shared 12s on Y-GATA-A10 for B-39 and A-43

Based on the initial results from the newest markers at FTDNA, upgrades to 67 markers is encouraged for the following:

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A-38 & F-4 to confirm their shared 18s on DYS576 indicate a recent common ancestor

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B-39 & B-16 to confirm their shared 36s on CDYa indicate a recent common ancestor

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D-11 & D-16 to confirm their shared 12s on DYS461 indicate a recent common ancestor

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B-35 to confirm mutations in B-28

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One of the men of the Henry, b1793 family to see if they link to the MD family

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A-17 to confirm the 24 on DYS481 represents Bavestor

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B-07 to confirm the 14 on DYS446 represents Moses

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X-1 to confirm a shared ancestor with A-17 & B-15

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Any or all of C-02, C-16, A-37, A-20, A-21, C-07, F-12 to confirm the 12 at DYS444 is the defining marker for the MD family

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Any of A-28, A-49, A-04 to confirm the 18 at DYS557 for Thomas m Sarah Wilson

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D-16, B-13, B-05, C-06, B-31 to determine which branch of CDYb and other branches (requires 37 marker test)

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A-47, A-16 to determine if they match a branch emerging in the latest markers

Testing was done at DNA Fingerprint (now a part of Family Tree DNA) on a limited group of 10 men.  Only 2 mutations were found across 30 additional markers and both appear to be recent.  There has been no further exploration of this possibility.

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